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liabilitys of the medicare and social security systems, the position of the united states verges on bankruptcy. because although we have a $10 trillion debt, the unfunded liabilities are $100 trillion. that's something that seems to me one can't likely dismiss. >> rose: a program note. we intended to show you this evening interviews with our friends malcolm glad well and job john grisham but because of the economic story, we will show you those interviews at a later time. tonight, orszag and ferguson when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: peter orszag is here, he is the director of the office of management and budget. called more than just the budget director by the "new yorker" magazine, he's deeply involved in president obama's ambitious domestic agenda as well. that includes health care, energy policy and entitlement reform. he's focus tong country's long-term fiscal health. the administration recently released projections showing deficits growing by $9 trillion over the next ten years. sp
think the with the can make? >> i think the intent is first to show the united states is very serious about the energy and climate issue, number one. number two, copenhagen, as president rasmussen has said, since congress won't be able to address the energy and climate bill until after copenhagen that it's a framework for all countries -- let me say that he proposed you expect going in, a framework that will say this is our goal, this is going to be towards a lelie binding treaty. we're not going to get there in copenhagen but this is the step we need to take in order to get there. the good news is there's a lot of motion going on and i am encouraged that a lot of countries are beginning to say, considering where we were five years ago and beyond, things are looking very positive. >> mr. secretary, the white house on wednesday also announced that it would offer a 20/20 emissions cut proposal 17% below 2005 levels. and described this proposal as a provisional proposal, earlyly contingent on congress enacting this legislation. what happens if the congress doesn't enact legislation? >> w
. but tonight, the question will be what our esteemed analysts think about the future of the united states as we stand here at the end of 2009. we really have an extraordinary group of panelists. let me just share their introduction so everyone knows who they are. i have learned that people like introductions. certainly, i like it louise gives me that wonderful introduction. we will first hear from richard haas, counsel for relations, who has worked with two presidents. as council president, he has truly been an entrepreneurial leader. it has always been important, but richard has he brought many scholars and expertise and wide range of subjects. his most recent book is called a " war of necessity, war of joyce," -- "war of necessity, war of choice." glenn hubbard is no ordinary academic. he is dean of columbia business and a tenured professor of finance and economics at the columbia school of arts and sciences. he has worked for the treasury and as a consultant to the federal reserve bank, and recently he wrote a book called "healthy, wealthy, and wise -- five steps to better health care system
is to understand the circumstances that are going on right now in terms of the compromise of the united states sovereignty by what's happening to the dollar with deficits budget to be positive so the last third of this book is solutions. what we can do as a subtitle says fighting new world order, surviving the global depression and preserving u.s. sovereignty. so the themes of this book at the last third or to give solutions and call to action for how we can organize our lives, how we can organize politically in order to fight back to say no to a global new deal. now, to get everyone's mind of around the idea of america for sale, i like to start at this way. we currently have page 24 of the book and document we have got about a 65.5 trillion what the t negative net worth. now what that means, that is according to the department treasury's own statistics. once a year the deeper and the treasury does a gap accounting and david walker, who was the head of the government accountability office actually resigned in 2008 it went on the week up to our alarming people, telling people essentially that i
that the future of the united states and asia is inextricably linked. >> president obama is in asia threw next week with stops in tokyo, singapore, shanghai, beijing. so who get as the lion's share of obama's time? china. three days out of nine replicating what happened recently at the u.n. where the president of china and president obama were closeted for 90 minutes. this time allocation speaks for itself. and if there is any doubt remaining, obama's description of the u.s./chinese relationship clears it up. >> the relationship between the united states and china will shape the 21st century, which makes it as important bilateral relationship in the world. >> question. what must president obama accomplish in china this coming week? pat? >> he'll have to rebalance the trade relationship between the united states and china. the last ten years, the chinese have had a $2 trillion surplus. we've experted to them jobs, factories, money, technology, and that's one of the reasons why we've got this financial crisis and the dollar's in such trouble. what he's got to do is convince the chinese that this
, the answer is i would probably start with something different from what we have in the united states. there is a wonderful book out there called "the healing of america," by a washington post reporter. what we have in the united states is an amalgam of the worst, that just about all of the system that you talked about, we have a little bit from this one, a little bit bad from this one, etc. so you end up with something that cims it is the best health care in the world when the statistics say it is pretty pathetic, the quality of health care and united states. >> you are saying the medicine is pathetic, so what about care? >> the medicine is pathetic, the results are pathetic. and the costs are exorbitant. >> that is very depressing. >> what happens then is that it gets demagogued to death. that is what we're seeing right now. the old things that scare people into tea parties, and from the left, things that are unrealistic. you end up in the same state of political paralysis, and the united states gets into deeper trouble providing something that should be a fundamental right in this
, john, because i don't think it will get through the united states senate. there's a reason for that, john. al gore's moment has come and gone. the truth is, they are changing the nile to climate change rather than global warming for a reason. for ten years, the earth has been cooling. 1998 or so was the hottest year. the polar bear population is doing fine. antarctica is growing, the ice cap is growing. the arctic ice cap has stopped shrinking. you look around the united states, you are having record cold trends. you have this tremendous real problem in the american economy as opposed toed mythical problem of global warming. for these reasons, john, i think it's not going to get through the senate. i think, as i say, al gore's moment has passed. this whole thing was a bit of a hoax designed to transfer power from individuals and wealth to governments and from governments to transnational, international corporations, global institutions. that time has come, and it has gone. >> eleanor? >> that was both a minority view and paranormic view that it's all a conspiracy to transfer power.
how the united states may change this influence, address this national security deficiencies him and provide global leadership in an era when the american economy may not be the overwhelming source of power it once was. increasingly, national influence will be determined by whether the countries can contribute to solving global problems or at lease whether they are making themselves indispensable to other nations. china and other developing economies are demanding a greater say in the management of the world economy through the g20 and other mechanisms. china's global leverage has increased as it liberally positioned itself as a creditor nation with more than 20% of the world current account balance surplus. we cannot depend invasively on china investing heavily in the united states government that. some thought must be given to how we work with china and other nations to establish a more sensible global balance that depends less on demand by american consumers. the united states in the g20 also must rethink the role of the international financial institutions that provide crisis
important to the united states? >>> india is going to be central to what we want to do in the world. >>> also, a disturbing new trend. police say they can't keep track of all of the registered sex offenders. there are just too many to keep an eye on. the internet provides easy prey. how can you keep your family safe? >>> good evening, and thanks for joining us. at this hour, we're waiting for the prime minister of india, manmohan singh, to arrive at the white house. president obama and the first lady will pay invitation to the first dinner. the list includes hollywood stars and business chiefs. 320 people will gather under a white house tent in the south lawn. singer jennifer hudson will headline the event. the symphony orchestra and the marine band will also perform. earlier today, president obama met with the indian prime minister and called them natural allies. topping the topics, global warming and trade. president obama has promised to visit india next year. >>> now to president obama's big decision on the war in afghanistan. the president said today he plans on finishing the j
>>> this is "gps" the global public square. welcome to our viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm fareed zakaria coming to you this week from london. we begin the show wan exclusive interview with maziar bahari "the newsweek" reporter who spent four months in an iranian prison. he's written about it in this week's "newsweek." he has a harrowing, moving tale to tell. and then the main event. i'm just back from new deli where i spoke with the prime minister of india manmolian singh. let's get started. everyone has forgotten you, those were words maziar bahari heard every day from interrogators during the four months he spent in solitary confine in the an iranian prison. maziar is my colleague, a fine journalist who works for "newsweek" he's also an award-winning filmmaker. he was arrested along with hundreds of others during the protests that followed iran's disputed election. the end of his ordeal came in october when he was released on bail of $3 billion reales, equal to $300,000 american dollars. he flew back to his home in london just days before his wife paola ga
square. welcome to our viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm fareed zakaria coming to you this week from london. we begin the show with an exclusive interview with maziar bahari, the "newsweek" reporter who spent four months in an iranian prison. he has written about it in this week's "newsweek." he has a harrowing, moving tale to tell. and then the main event. i'm just back from new delhi where i spoke with the prime minister of india manmohan singh. in his only television interview on his trip to washington, d.c. let's get started. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >>> everyone has forgotten you. those were words maziar bahari heard every day from interrogators during the four months he spent in solitary confinement in an iranian prison. maziar is my colleague, a fine journalist who works for "newsweek." he's also an award-winning filmmaker. he was arrested along with hundreds of others during the protests that followed iran's disputed election. the end of his ordeal came in october when he was released on bail of $3 billion reales, equal to 300,000 american d
, they said, take care of yourself to get reelected. >> the opposite of a democrat in the united states, the difference is a conservative, not a republican. you cannot be -- a republican if you are not against big spending. >> keep thinking that. >> here is what i would say. what i would say is, look at virginia. bob macdonald reached over, not by moderating his principles, but by saying that his principles were not only good for saying, no. he says he wants to grow the economy, but he just wants us to do it, not washington. there is a positive, republican agenda out there. we will see more of that in 2010. >> when i first opted to propose the question, this was slightly more off-base. i want to bring up the idea. i came down here from boston, where republican was a dirty word. not because of the belief system but the reputation. my question is how much opinion is placed in the word, republican or democrat. and how much is in the ideology. how much will this affect things over the last year? how much has that changed? >> it is an interesting attachment to the word republican, as there i
and shakers of the united states of america. that is why i am here. that is why i am doing this luncheon. i feel like -- the gratitude is out of this world right now for having me do this. it really quick, i want to thank everybody for this honor. i want to thank you for inviting me to speak. the recorders of the industry and all of the change agents, you, the press, has a very special responsibility, and that is to be a mirror for us to see ourselves, our community, our country, and the rest of the world, and a truly respect the rule that you play in our system. i am sure that many of you are asking why would i want to speak at the national press club in washington, d.c., and why would they invite me? i make my living by stringing together verses or playing a part in some movie or television series that you may all have seen, "law and order," by the way. what would ludacris have to say? what would i have to say about leadership? i am going to say a lot of different things, so take what i say a word for word. you wonder if i plan to run for office, maybe for president in 2012. you do not ha
. . every industrialized country has that system except the united states. we are going to change that. national polls show that the majority of doctors and the majority of americans favor a single payer system. that is why six months ago, we went to capitol hill. when senator baucus opened that first day of hearing in may, i stood up and said, excuse me, sir, why have you taken single payer off the table? why have you not allowed one doctor testify for single payer? baucus ordered us arrested. one by one, margaret, kevin, carol, and four others stood up and confronted baucus. and one by one we were all arrested and charged with disruption of congress. in a plea deal earlier this year, we agreed not to disrupt congress throughout the end of this year. since that day in may, baucus and harry reid in the senate, and nancy pelosi and steny hoyer in the house have cobbled together incomprehensible legislation. it is convoluted and confusing. but one thing is clear -- president obama and the democrats have cut a dirty deal with the health insurance and pharmaceutical industries. obama took
effect. a recent study by our national academy of sciences found that here in the united states burning fossil fuels leads to almost 120 billion dollars in health costs a year. most of those costs are premature deaths, and we know that the cost in human lives can be even higher in countries we merging economies that have fewer resources to improve air quality. for all of these reasons, president obama and i understand that we cannot wait any longer to act. president obama has made it clear that he's committed to passing comprehensive energy and climate legislation that will create millions of new jobs and secure clean energy sources that are made in america and work for america. but in the meantime, we're looking for ways that we can start reducing this threat right now. last friday i saw some of you at a white house stakeholder briefing i hosted with lisa jackson, the administrator of our environmental protection agency. at that briefing we talked about many of the steps my department is taking in this area from funding research on the health costs of greenhouse gas emissions to invest
service is enshrined in the constitution of the united states. we have a law that says the postal service should produce universal service. we have to maintain a basic service. host: joseph, independent caller. caller: one of the previous callers mentioned at the topic -- the vending machines. i look forward to going to the post office now with dread. one local post office has a giant hole in the wall covered with plywood where the vending machines used to be. when i asked one of the minister why they were gone. she said it was cost control. there's no way it can be more efficient to have all those people waiting in line. it makes no sense to me. there's something seriously wrong with the reasoning behind this kind of decision. i have seen it across the board. they're using space in the post offices for selling packages that have teddy bears and balloons on them. they should be sticking to basics, common-sense service. if i can avoid going to the post office, i will do it. they might as well -- it is just a nightmare. it is a baffling ordeal. guest: i am sorry to your use say that. you ar
industrial zone between egypt, israel and the united states. it has helped to boost our trade and export to the united states. but in the meantime, we are also working in new channels to support some initiatives between the two countries. and that's what i hope we can conclude in washington on monday. >> and what would you like to hear in order to walk away and feel that that was successful? >> well, we are still waiting to hear from the administration a stronger message about opening up in trade, not just with egypt, also with the rest of the world. i think that is a big question hanging at the moment in terms of the position of the administration, towards liberalization of trade. and i have to admit that this is a worry that we all have in emerging markets at the moment. but i feel confident because of the long history of the relationship between the two countries, that the support for a high level of economic cooperation between egypt and the united states will be materialized during this administration. >> well, it's true, i guess, in the economic slowdown, you know, countries across
to be very important. but the biggest thing is the united states is going to do well. i mean, we can't move the railroad to china or india. they haven't figured out how to do that. so sort of like the song of new york-- we have to make it here or we can't make it anywhere. >> rose: frank sinatra. >> but it does move move a ton of good 470 miles on one gallon of diesel. a train replaces 280 trucks on the road. it emidst far less into the atmosphere that's damaging than trucking, and it moves-- i'm talking about the whole rail industry-- it moves 40% of the good. >> rose: and you have new ports of entry like houston. >> and we're going to have more people in this country and they're going to be using more kdz gdz over time. sure, there's a bad year from time to time. in the next 100 years there will probably be 15 bad years and i don't know what order they'll appear but i know the railroads will be essential. >> rose: when you called charlie munger and said i'm thinking about this, did he say right on warren? >> if charlie said right on warren, i would figure it would be a wrong number. that
in this new media. when somebody stands up in the congress of the united states during the state of the union and said, " ." >> nobody in the caucus supported what he did -- "you lie." >> nobody in the caucus supported what he did. the civility is not news. we try not to bash the media, hillary. we had an earlier conversation that talk about immigration reform where a truly bipartisan group of senators get together and all slated then, not quite, but there were in large number of democratic and republican senators working on it. that was in 2007. john mccain was simultaneously running for president. he and senator kennedy were the two leaders, the co-authors of the bill. you never saw them together in public however. kennedy said to mccain, look, we cannot show up in tv cameras together or you will lose new hampshire. it is how the press promotes incivility. >> the sense of being in the political minority, the only way you get hurt is to be no easier and more obnoxious. clearly, democrats, we did that -- we talked a lot about this during george bush's presidency. now republicans are doing a t
conference with president obama. let's listen in. >> the deep bonds between the people of the united states and india and a historic opportunity we have to strengthen the partnership between our nations. india today is a rising and responsible global power. in asia, indian leadership is expanding prosperity and security across the region. and the united states welcomes and encourages india's leadership role in helping to shape the rise of a stable, peaceful and prosperous asia. beyond asia, the world's largest multiethnic democracy is one of the world's fastest growing economies and as a member of the g-2 o india will play a pivotal role in meeting the major challenges we face today. and this includes my top economic priority, creating good jobs with good wages for the the american people. so i believe the relationship between the united states and india will be one of the defining partnerships of the 21st century. and this visit underscores the strengthening of that partnership, which i hope will continue throughout my presidency. that's why i have made it a priority to broaden the coopera
of the united states to take a look at your antitrust exemption. york $8 billion organization has not taken seriously responsibility to the players. a fact of the matter is, if yes, people want to play. they are going to be injured and we know that no matter what kind of helmet you build, no matter what kind of equipment that you have, it is a dangerous sport. people are going to be injured. the only question is, what you going to do -- are you going to pay the injured player and their family for the injuries that they have received and how can you be a multi-billion operation? se profits, but i think the responsibility of this congress is to take a look at that anti--trust exemption that you have. in my estimation, take it away. i yield back the balance of my time. >> i thank the gentlewoman for her modest suggestions. [laughter] the chair recognizes howard from north carolina. >> thank you, mr. chairman. what does the alumni association have to say to active pro, college and high school players about the importance of early and completely presenting to team physicians any sims that may ha
telling the president of the united states no, i don't even want olympia snowe, i'd want one republican supporting health care bill? >> the truth is -- i'm going to disagree right now. free enterprise does not work particularly well in health care and i will tell you why. the administration rate -- >> we don't have insurance companies competing across state lines 3 >> that's the worst thing you could do. >> are you kidding me? >> yes. i will explain why this is. in my state, everybody under 18 has health care. you cannot be refused by any insurance company, no matter what the reason is. everybody gets charged the same. you cannot charge a sick patient who is older more than 20% more than you can charge a young, healthy patient. that has been going on for 15 years. if you could let people buy insurance across state lines, you are making the texas health commissioner be my health commissioner. do you know what the insurance rate is in in texas? 25%. 22% of children have no health insurance in texas. i do not want health commissioner in texas to have anything to do with my health insurance
number of people in the united states who are related to each other and we just don't know it. >> tonight the woman who uncovered michelle obama's family ties will give us more detail and dig into my own roots. >> this, for example, is your grandmother. >>> this is your only source for news, cnn prime time begins now. here's campbell brown. >>> hi there, everybody. we start tonight, as always, with the mashup. we're watching it all so you don't have to and tonight after weeks of debate at the white house about what to do in afghanistan, the president has made a decision. the pentagon right now is drawing up plans to send about 34,000 u.s. troops to afghanistan and what that means is that young men and women from around the country will be packing up and shipping out very soon. president obama is expected to make the official announcement next tuesday in a prime time address. >> it is my intention to finish the job, and i feel confident when the american people hear a clear rationale for what we're doing there and how we intend to achieve our goals that they will be supportive. >> i antici
it from europe, you see it from the united states and you see it from asia. tell me what you see. >> well, i see a very different situation. in europe there is no recovery and i think 2010's going to be a mediocre year in europe. same thing in japan. we don't see any recovery. we see resistance to the decline but no recovery. in the united states, things look more promising for the short term. you know, after a very large chop in the economy and particularly in the automobile industry. >> rose: but generally those impressions you just said are about the economy overall. >> yeah, but the economy overall we see slight growth in 2010. but a situation very different from one country to the other. >> rose: at what point in an economic recovery do consumers think about automobiles? >> well, you know, it depends where the consumer is. if he's in china or in brazil or india, he's thinking all the time about automobiles. what's the best opportunity? what's the best deal? and we're seeing these sales booming all the time. you know, no matter what. now, in that time, you have an increase of 5% or 10
the united states and india have not always been one. during the cold war, many saw india as unfriendly, which it might have been. during -- at the end of the cold war, there were opportunities to securitized. in the past several years, there has been a lifting of sanctions culminating in the historic civil nuclear accord. now, there@@@@@@h@ @ @ @ @ @ @ r strategic partnership. there is a need for wide ranging consultation to in grain habits of consultation -- to ingrain minister for being here. i want to welcome his entire delegation, including his most able ambassador and want to thank the gentleman standing here, lee hamilton, who is president and director of the woodrow wilson international center. i could not be more pleased to introduce the prime minister. lee hamilton resented the ninth district in the u.s. house of representatives and he is a model of what a legislator of to be. -- ought to be. congressman hamilton? [applause] >> good evening to you all and thank you for coming. i told the prime minister a moment ago that he was appearing before an extraordinary washington audie
-- and i would say enthusiastic role by the united states of america, these negotiations will not yield the kind of the kind of results that we are looking for. true, we would have hoped that the united states of america would have been more ambitious than what it has indicated. >> reporter: india is also one of the world's largest producers of greenhouse gas emissions, but is a relative newcomer to an industrialized economy. saran says the country has concerns that a climate agreement could stifle economic development. >> for us, climate change is not just a separate issue, it is intermixed with our developmental, you know, issues itself. so how we balance, you know, the problem of climate change with the other stresses and strains that the country is going through as this process of social and economic transformation, we would hope that there is some understanding of that challenge that we face. >> reporter: meantime, a series of studies released today in the british medical journal "the lancet" could give another boost to advocates of addressing climate change. the studies found that
my a role is to said how can the department of energy help the united states become economically competitive in this future clean energy economy and also, if we can get pardon ships with china and india that would be mutually beneficial to both of us, we have to get moving. it is just like the cafe center. that is getting moving. >> what number target from china would impress you? >> a number that would impress me, i would get to look at the details, but if i took their already stated it intensity and goals and where they want to be in terms of renewable energy, nuclear, hydro, wind, solar, those things, anybody who wraps those things up and says we will be at least there, here is where we are going to be. but those are aggressive goals. that be quite a commitment. >> the administration is concerned not to repeat what they called the mistake of kyoto. our commitments to reduce emissions among developed countries. united states never ratified that, and the bush administration basically walked away from it. can you give some assurance that whatever commitment or promise or gold the
of denmark, the president of the united states, and some discussions with the chinese president, we have the capacity to lead an agreement at copenhagen. one which deals with the corps policy challenges for the future. namely, what temperature increase are we prepared to sustain in the future? what targets do we need from the major developed economies around the world? what commitment to action do we needrom the major emerging economies like china and india? how do we found this agreement? what kind of climate change process to put in place? if we can land and an outcome of those areas, we will have made a large step forward. and then translating that into legalese will take longer. >> talking about a long by the agreement is not possible? >> will we are talking about is what i would describe as an operational framework agreement. what president obama said the other day, one which would take immediate effect. there's a separation between what is said in a policy agreement, and the difficulty and complexity of translating that into a 4000 page binding legal document. you cannot get to the
together this time with the united states and with binding obligations in some form on china and other large emerging economies and it's significant because the scientific community globally has ratcheted up their sense of alarm and you are general they we really don't have too many years to begin are reducing the global warming pollution that is driving the earth's ecological system toward catastrophe. >> rose: stay with that. they say ten years. the window they say is ten years essentially? >> yeah, and they said that three years ago. >> rose: and cat trophy means what? >> there's certain elements in the earth's ecological system that could be pushed beyond a kind of tipping point the phrase is controversial. but if the greenland ice pack, for example, was induced to melt so rapidly that it could not be stopped that would lead to catastrophic sea level rise, similarly in west antarctica. either would produce a six to seven meter increase. the size of the continental united states, it's been there for three million years, a key element in the earth's ability to cool itself, if it disa
is the optimal solution to provide necessary medical treatment to everyone and the united states in a way that controls health care costs. pnhp doesn't, however, take a position on how congress members should vote on the legislation that is currently proceeding for congress. we do provide information to members about whether the legislation is likely to be ctive, and how icompes to a national single payer health care system. we joined the many health care reform advocates across the nation who are disappointed by the health insurance reform legislation that is passing through congress. we, like you, are seriously concerned by the health care environment in the united states. we are saddened by the number of people, our patience, family and friends who are donner and because they cannot receive or for access to health care. we are saddened by the number of people facing bankruptcy or foreclosure of their homes and those who are suffering needlessly because they cannot afford or have access to medical treatment. the anticipated a health care debate this year that would focus on the trees st
hnology is more important than ever in driving the united states economy and also 33 percent saying united states will be the global tech leader and a lot of americans think we will not. why is that? >> there's good reason to be concerned. it's not so much that america's innovation pro west is lagging but that the rest of the world is catching us. the recession has not helped with unemployment at ten percent we have good minds not contributing to the economy and we've seen anybody incorporate america has seen a lot of projects and r and d spending cut back as companies try to trim costs as their top line as shrunk so the survey captures the notion that both in the long-term and short-term there's things to be concerned about. > the first paragraph of the story says by most measures, america remains the world leader in technology achievement. consider the 2009 nobel prize winners of the 13 people honored nine were america's. not bad, right? >> but the nobel is a lagging indicator that people earn that typically at the end of their career for work that took place in many cases years and years pri
the united states and india can strengthen the global economic recovery, promote trade that creates jobs for both our people and pursue growth that is balanced and sustained. as nuclear powers we can be full partners in preventing the spread of the world's most deadly weapons, securing loose nuclear materials from terrorists, and pursuing our shared vision of a world without nuclear weapons. >> india and america are separated by distance but bound together by the values of democracy, rule of law and respect for fundamental human freedoms. >> reporter: there's also some hard cash involved in this. american businesses are looking at india and seeing dollar signs because as you look at their infrastructure rebuilding, ports, airports, roads, etc., the chamber of commerce predicts they could over the next five years, u.s. companies could make $500 billion. this is also a good deal. >> what do both sides get out of this state visit? >> reporter: i think the united states gives india what it wants which is recognition that it is a very important country in the world right now, that in spite of
, opening up new opportunities for u.s. workers here in the united states of america which is exactly what is being said to president obama as he meets in korea at this moment with their leadership. with president lee and others. so i think that we need to have our attention in this congress focused on the priorities -- the priorities the american people have. fire fighting is very, very important. but again this measure will pass if not unanimously narrowly unanimously and it will do so and i hope get the resources to ensure that we never have the loss of life like those of captain hall and others. but i know from having spoken to their families, mr. speaker, that they believe that the absolutely essential for us to encourage private sector job creation and economic growth and that's why i'm talking about this priority that needs to be addressed here. now, mr. speaker, i'm going to urge my colleagues to defeat the previous question as we move ahead. why? because the issue of reading legislation is another very, very important one that is before us. there is a bipartisan proposal launched
of the united states. finally, i just think it's important to point out someone who remembers working in the white house before the state dinner would happen, it's the entire building is a buzz and it's really a way of sort of literally rolling out the red carpet of the united states to another member of the world community and it's such an important symbolic act. it can't be overstated to show that the united states wants to engage the rest of the world and show the united states respects cultures from around the world and let's not forget the president won by asian americans by a large margin so an important symbol here at home to that community. >> danny, as we wait to see the president and prime minister step out, we know they are behind closed doors and part of the conversation is certainly afghanistan and pakistan. you've got vice president dick cheney coming out critical of the administration saying it was dithering but what about making india a key player in whatever happens in afghanistan regarding the strategy? >> i would have to agree. i think our relationship with india wi
to our viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm fareed zakaria. we have a fascinating show for you today, a continuation of our conversation with maziar bahari, the "newsweek" reporter who spent four months in a prison in tehran. this week we hear of his release and his talks on the regime that jailed him. the main event is a conversation with eric schmitt, the ceo of what is surely the company most associated with the cutting edge of technology. google. we talk about innovation, technology and more. eric is perfectly qualified to discuss it all, a princeton-trained engineer he was chief technology officer at sun microsystems, then the ceo of novell before he took on the challenge of running google. innovation has always been on my mind. i've assumed this was an area where america remained head and shoulders above the world. that's where our future lies, how we'll move up the value chain and reuate new jobs for the future. over the last few months i've been having second thoughts. i've been reading these new studies that use not polls of experts but hard data and they sugge
celebrate the great and growing partnership between the united states and india. as we all know in india some of life's most precious moments are often celebrated under the cover of a beautiful tent. it's a little like tonight, we have incredible food and music and are surrounded by great friends. for it's been said that the most beautiful things in the universe are the starry heavens above us and the feeling of duty within us. mr. prime minister, today we work to fulfill our duty, bring our countries closer together than ever before. tonight under the stars we celebrate the spirit that will sustain our partnership, the bonds of friendship between our people. it's a bond that includes more than 2 million indian-americans who enrich every corner of our great nation. leaders in government, science, industry and the arts, some of whom join us tonight and the bond of friendship between a president and prime minister who are bound by the same unshakable spirit of possibility in brotherhood that transforms both our nations, the spirit that gave rise to movements led by giants like gandhi and k
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